It’s that time of year again! This Saturday, us ducks will brace ourselves for the third-annual Quack-Hack.
17 ducks. Five projects. 24 hours.
Follow along to watch us build (and find out what’s in that big box of prizes).

It’s that time of year again! This Saturday, us ducks will brace ourselves for the third-annual Quack-Hack.

17 ducks. Five projects. 24 hours.

Follow along to watch us build (and find out what’s in that big box of prizes).


The üBus site is up! http://ubus.co.uk/
After Tom’s heroic all-nighter, team DRADIS’s front-end is almost finished. Tauseef is working his ASP.NET magic to make requests to the live api and plot the buses to the map. Nash is designing the icons and bus stop pop-up data so it’s all GO from team DRADIS and the üBus service!

The üBus site is up! http://ubus.co.uk/

After Tom’s heroic all-nighter, team DRADIS’s front-end is almost finished. Tauseef is working his ASP.NET magic to make requests to the live api and plot the buses to the map. Nash is designing the icons and bus stop pop-up data so it’s all GO from team DRADIS and the üBus service!

Cuckooquack latest

As we come to the end of the first day physical construction of the Cuckooquack is almost complete!! Craig and Jenni have been dusting up (literally) on their carpentry skills and have build the visual feature of the Cuckooquack project.

Craig has also been working on wiring the LEDs to enable Benjamin to take over the circuit building and link up the Arduino. In addition, the front end of the product that contains a feed and admin panel has been wireframed and designed. Based on Craig’s designs, Alex has built the webservice interface so that commands can be sent to the raspberry pi and built the models that will populate the commands for the interface. He’s also created a modular plugin system so that different APIs can be sourced to gather the data that will be display, and built an example twitter plugin to test it. Meanwhile, Benjamin has been working on the back end API as well as joining the LEDs and LCD screen with javascript.

We’re excited to reveal the final project tomorrow…

Grange Hill Gang Update

We are now nine hours into the hackathon and team Grange Hill Gang have been making some good progress. Here is a small update on what each of the gang has been working on:

Siji Onabanjo (The All-Rounder) - has been working alongside the Matt devising the information architecture and the app map. He also designed some of the key screens based on the template put together by Matt.  

Matt Gibson (Teacher’s Pet) - has been coding the front-end bootstrap based on the designs that were produced this morning. The bootstrap is being coded to be responsive, using Cyber-Duck’s very own hoisin framework (now available on Github).

Mark (Class Geek) - has been working on the backend to ensure that the front-end is ready for integration. He has set up the node.js server built on a framework designed by himself. This is something that is technically very advanced and once tweaked will be open-sourced for the wider development community to enjoy. We will produce a short walkthrough tutorial to explain his achievement in further detail.

Tom and Nash have been making good progress with the üBus front end by changing the Google Map control layouts and going for a single header.
Meanwhile, Tauseef has made a crucial breakthrough with the TfL API and has been able to map a single bus route - the 107 right outside Cyber-Duck’s office!
DRADIS’s next steps will be to merge Tom and Tauseef’s code, then get the search bar working.

Tom and Nash have been making good progress with the üBus front end by changing the Google Map control layouts and going for a single header.

Meanwhile, Tauseef has made a crucial breakthrough with the TfL API and has been able to map a single bus route - the 107 right outside Cyber-Duck’s office!

DRADIS’s next steps will be to merge Tom and Tauseef’s code, then get the search bar working.

Three Men and a Marketing Lady make the CuckooQuack

Our team is made up of: Ben M, Alex, Craig, Jennifer… 3 men and a marketing lady!

As soon as we came in this morning we occupied the downstairs board room and meeting room as our project entails constructing a material object.

The table is now strewn with technology and tools including 4 laptops, 3 Arduinos, breadboards, hack saws, jig saws, hammers, wires and LEDs along with a copious amount of energy drinks and the fundamental ingredient…a cuckoo clock.

Our project will see the physical building of a fun notification system for the Cyber-Duck office – the “CuckooQuack”. It is ambitious to say the least. By the end of the day tomorrow, we plan to have 2 Arduino boards powering the display functionality, a Raspberry Pi running the backend system to trigger the Arduino events and a web server telling the Pi what to do. As I said, it is ambitious.

In the first few hours, one half of the team (the developers) set up the Arduino to test the LEDs, set the Pi up on the wifi and pulled down the latest release of Laravel. The other half of the team (design), went about carpentry. We now have a disected cuckoo clock, a shelf and an orange speech bubble. The hardest part of the project so far is finding thin plastic ducks, which seemed to be the last problem we anticipated given the number of ducks floating around the office.

Our next steps are designing and building the API schema that the webserver will share with the Pi. We want to be able to change this through the webserver so need a robust yet flexible design. This will fee us up to add more functionality to the alerts and can keep control on a pleasant web based user interface.

Over the next few posts we will cover the different aspects of the “CuckooQuack” that the team is working on. Powering an Arduino through Javascript, integrating APIs to a custom API for a node.js server and mutilating an antique.

Watch this space…

Grange Hill Gang - Homeworker.io

In the famous words of Alice Cooper, ‘school’s out for summer’, as many schools up and down the country rung their bells for the final time this school year. Whilst many are thinking about how they intend to spend their summer holidays the focus here at the Cyber-Duck School of Code is already on the next term as we look to create an app that will allow teachers, pupils, and parents to effectively manage and monitor homework.

Over the next 48 hours, The Grange Hill Gang (comprising of Matt Gibson, Mark Garratt, and Siji Onabanjo) will be developing an app that will be replacing homework diaries once the term starts again in September. The app will have three elements:

Teachers:

Secondary School teachers will be able to set homework tasks for pupils in their class via the app and track the progress of students to ensure tasks are completed.  

Students

Students would use the app to manage their homework schedule across their various classes, and similar to a homework diary mark off tasks that have been completed.

Parents

Parents of pupils are able to keep track of the homework being set for their children and will use the app to confirm homework tasks have been completed.

The idea for this app came from speaking to both parents and teachers who were dissatisfied with the existing format of homework diaries. Here are some of the main gripes we discovered during our research:

  • Homework diaries were often not kept up to date by pupils meaning tasks were forgotten about.
  • In many schools it is up to the pupils to write down the homework tasks and this would lead to some misconceptions of what was required.
  • If a pupil is absent from a lesson, there is no guaranteed way of ensuring they are aware of the homework that has been set.
  • Parents wanted to be more informed of the tasks being set for their children
  • Parents were concerned about how easy it was for pupil’s to fraudulently sign-off homework on their behalf. 

We hope to address these issues with this app.

 

More updates to follow…

The morning report

Both teams have stayed up all night, working relentlessly into the early hours. With the presentation deadline approaching, they are now working to finish their projects and prepare to present their ideas.

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Team Awesome

Team Awesome are getting closer to having a finished application, which and have been invited to demonstrate it to the Met Police who are hacking in the same building.

The biggest development has been the roll out of the crime radius feature. When a user clicks on an area of the map, a simple report is generated showing the number of different crimes committed within a mile of that location.

The group are now generating the data that has been cached locally. In the larger cities the API could not support the amount of data that was needed to generate the heatmap.

The heatmap has been designed so that it reflects the seriousness of crime (using the Kynaston scale) in an area as well as the frequency/ reoccurrence of the crime.         

As it’s been built as a responsive web app, we now have the application working on tablet and mobile. Functions can be used as touch. – some of the interfaces still need a lot of work.

Team WCL

Since the last update, the group have been working tirelessly to implement Google Maps on the web page to display the travel area and nearby GP surgeries. The group came to a bottleneck and had to spend time linking and integrating everyone’s individual work together. The user submission form is now very close to completion.

Team WCL will spend the rest of the day testing and setting up the form submission and neatening up the front end.

Team Awesome - The Crime Heat Mapp
OpenStreetMap has been easy to set up and the timeline feature is also working. They stumbled upon a problem whereby the amount of data is too large to process, and is a lot more than previously thought. The UK is crime ridden!
As all the APIs are working well we have got the heatmap working. The group plan to work overnight, prototyping using crime data only in London, splitting the capital into grid segments. By downloading the data in advance and then grouping it together within the grids, they should be able to overcome the problem of the overwhelming amount of data.

Team W.C.L - GPSearch
Benjamin has done a responsive layout using Twitter bootstrap, its elastic with breakpoints for tablet and mobile. It’s layout includes a form to enable search, with a map next to it (or below for mobile).
After searching, the user will get a text list as well as a map, covering accessibility.
Fabrizio has done a wrapper for Ben’s library to keep the integration with the travel time API clean.
Mark has taken the CSV file with all the GP practices, imported it into the database, converting eastings and northings into longitude and latitude – storing that into MongoDB with a 2D index to allow geo-spatial query.
The next stage is to integrate all the components and start putting together a finished application.

The Lone-Duck - RollingOnTheTube

After creating the user interface (UI) and finding that it is quite complex to aggregate the dataset by combining postcode with latitude and longitude and accessible tube stations, Danny decided to have a change of direction. Tomorrow he is going to try to develop a UI that obtains the location of the user via the GPS, which will be mapped against the longitude and latitude dataset that also has accessible tube stations alongside each coordinate.

Team Awesome - The Crime Heat Mapp

OpenStreetMap has been easy to set up and the timeline feature is also working. They stumbled upon a problem whereby the amount of data is too large to process, and is a lot more than previously thought. The UK is crime ridden!

As all the APIs are working well we have got the heatmap working. The group plan to work overnight, prototyping using crime data only in London, splitting the capital into grid segments. By downloading the data in advance and then grouping it together within the grids, they should be able to overcome the problem of the overwhelming amount of data.

Team W.C.L - GPSearch

Benjamin has done a responsive layout using Twitter bootstrap, its elastic with breakpoints for tablet and mobile. It’s layout includes a form to enable search, with a map next to it (or below for mobile).

After searching, the user will get a text list as well as a map, covering accessibility.

Fabrizio has done a wrapper for Ben’s library to keep the integration with the travel time API clean.

Mark has taken the CSV file with all the GP practices, imported it into the database, converting eastings and northings into longitude and latitude – storing that into MongoDB with a 2D index to allow geo-spatial query.

The next stage is to integrate all the components and start putting together a finished application.

The Lone-Duck - RollingOnTheTube

After creating the user interface (UI) and finding that it is quite complex to aggregate the dataset by combining postcode with latitude and longitude and accessible tube stations, Danny decided to have a change of direction. Tomorrow he is going to try to develop a UI that obtains the location of the user via the GPS, which will be mapped against the longitude and latitude dataset that also has accessible tube stations alongside each coordinate.

Each team presented their ideas to the rest of the group. Below is what the QuackHack teams will be working on over the next 24 hours.
Team Awesome

Team Awesome is made up of Alex, Gareth, Ben and Andrew. They are creating an application which draws from the Police UK API, and displays the levels of crime throughout the whole of the UK using heat maps. They will include a scrolling timeline so that users can see how crime levels have fluctuated in the past 3 years.


Team W.C.L.
Team W.C.L. (Wireless Connexion Lost) is made up of Benjamin, Mark and QuackHack recruit, Fabrizio. They are building an responsive web application which essentially helps people find their nearest GPs based on the travel times from their location and their preferred transport routes.

They will be drawing data from the iGeolize API, Google maps and the GP data from http://data.gov.uk/

Team Lone-Duck
Danny is the Lone-Duck, developing an android mobile app to help wheelchair users find the closest wheelchair accessible London underground train station to their location. He is currently facing the dilemma of either trying to aggregate the tube station accessibility info and location or building his own sample data store.

Each team presented their ideas to the rest of the group. Below is what the QuackHack teams will be working on over the next 24 hours.

Team Awesome

Team Awesome is made up of Alex, Gareth, Ben and Andrew. They are creating an application which draws from the Police UK API, and displays the levels of crime throughout the whole of the UK using heat maps. They will include a scrolling timeline so that users can see how crime levels have fluctuated in the past 3 years.

Team W.C.L.

Team W.C.L. (Wireless Connexion Lost) is made up of Benjamin, Mark and QuackHack recruit, Fabrizio. They are building an responsive web application which essentially helps people find their nearest GPs based on the travel times from their location and their preferred transport routes.

They will be drawing data from the iGeolize API, Google maps and the GP data from http://data.gov.uk/

Team Lone-Duck

Danny is the Lone-Duck, developing an android mobile app to help wheelchair users find the closest wheelchair accessible London underground train station to their location. He is currently facing the dilemma of either trying to aggregate the tube station accessibility info and location or building his own sample data store.